News

  • Solar panels sit on the Engineering building at Colorado State University. Solar panel additions are common on other buildings throughout the campus.(Photo credit: Megan Fischer)
  • The University of Dayton announced in June that it would begin divesting coal and fossil fuels from its investment pool, making it the first Catholic university in the U.S. to do so.
  • A suburban Village Hall that closed its doors after an alleged threat over a proposed power plant will reopen Sept. 2 with new security measures, authorities said Tuesday.
  • Crystal Solar and NREL Team Up to Cut Costs August 27, 2014 A faster, cheaper way to manufacture silicon solar cells, partially funded by the Energy Department and fine-tuned at its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has won a coveted R&D 100 award as one of the top technology innovations of 2013.
  • Fitch Ratings has affirmed the 'A-' rating on the following South Mississippi Electric Power Association (SMEPA) outstanding bonds.
  • Vacationers have but a few choices when they need a charge at the Oceanfront. There's Len's condo near 10th Street, Floyd's place at the North End and Jim's mobile home by the Virginia Beach Convention Center.
  • Xcel Energy asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Tuesday to issue a ruling that Boulder cannot condemn a high voltage transmission line that circles the city without first getting the federal regulators' permission.
  • India has raised the stakes in an ongoing trade battle with the US at the World Trade Organization (WTO) by rolling out an ambitious campaign to promote solar energy through the Indian Army and central public sector units (CPSUs) -- providing them with grants on the condition that they source equipment from domestic manufacturers.
  • Residents in Lake County's northern cities can get up to $5,000 in free weatherization work that will keep their homes cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter, and cut their utility bills year-round.
  • A second turbine at Martin Drake Power Plant has powered up and that coupled with lower natural gas prices means residential Utilities customers might soon pay 36 cents less a month for electricity than before the fire at the plant.